Calling All Loftons (Loftins)! Do you know my Grandmother’s People?

I continue to struggle getting back to posting in my blog.  On February 13th, almost five months after the death of my mother, my eldest sister Irma Marie Frank passed.  Needless to say, her death has also left me devastated.

Irma Frank

Irma Frank

Like my mother, my sister was a big proponent of my genealogical research.  I’m so happy that I followed my gut and had both of them take DNA tests before their passing.  Maybe it will be their DNA that will ultimately lead me to my grandmother’s maternal line.

Since my last post, I have received one additional hint about the identity of my maternal great-grandmother.  For those of you that use ancestry.com for your family research, you may be aware that in 2015 Ancestry.com, added a searchable database that I found to be extremely useful.  Last year, Ancestry.com added an addition to their Social Security Death Index (SSDI): U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index.  This database provides more details about social security applicants, which may include their full name (including applicable maiden name), birth data, and place of birth.  However, the most important information I’ve found in the database are the names of the applicant’s parents.

As you may recall from my last post, I found my grandmother Estella Rubin’s mother’s name on a marriage license, which was listed as Eva Laughtin.  I wasn’t sure if the Laugh had a “Law”sound  such as Lawton or a “Loff” sound like in the name Lofton, but at least I had a name.

I had hoped that I would be able to confirm the name by using the Social Security application database on Ancestry.com.  Unfortunately, my grandmother’s application was not online.  I followed the instructions provided on the Ancestry site and submitted the request to the Social Administration office to get a copy of my grandmother’s application.  Since I had her social security number, the cost of the copy was $27; the cost is $29 if you do not have the SSIN.  Here’s what I received:

Application

Application

From the application, looks like my grandmother listed her mother as Evil Loffton.  Do you have any other ideas what the mother’s name in the document? Maybe the name is Evie Lofton?  I’m not familiar with any Loftons.  Do you know any Loftons out of Mowata in Saint Landry parish in the great state of Louisiana? Hit me up with any information you can share on this subject.

Happy searching!

My Grandmother’s Name?

Momí Joanna

Momí Joanna

 

Momí Joanna, my paternal grandmother, moved to our house when her youngest son threatened to kill her. This son, my uncle Albert, had two daughters he named Judy and a liked to drink. He was known to some as a fighter, always in trouble. One day, he was picking on a much smaller man with the last name of Doucet.   Doucet slashed at him with a razor. Uncle Albert had to be rushed to the hospital with long cuts across his entire body and suffered significant blood loss.  His body rejected the blood transfusion.  He had been given the wrong blood type.

This all happened in the 60s. My mother Ella, along with my father and Momí Joanna went to visit him when he was in the hospital. Only my mother was allowed to see him. Although Ella begged him to see his mother and brother, he refused.

He always blamed Momí. For everything: for the drinking, the fighting, and the hospital bed. When he was growing up, Momí was too soft. He’d get into trouble, with neighbors or with the law, and she’d just give him a pass. “I know that wasn’t my Albert,” she’d say after he was caught with another boy stealing a bike. “I’m not going to touch him. I know that wasn’t him.”

On some level, Uncle Albert wished she had scolded or hit him when he was young.  Maybe he thought if she had, he would have turned out in a better way.

“No,” he told my mother. “I don’t want to see her. I hate her.”

Shortly after, Uncle Albert died.

That was not my experience with Uncle Albert.   He was to me a comforting soul.  He would watch me and my youngest sister while my mother, his sister-in-law, worked in her beauty shop.  I remember him lifting me and sister up into the tree and we would jump into his waiting arms laughing and giggling.  He was my protector and with him I had no fears.

There is one image that comes to mind when I think of Momí Joanna.  I must have been about 4 years old when she came to live with us. I picture her in our house. She is matter-of-factly squeezing my mother’s breast.

“Oh, no, girl, that’s drying up. That is drying up.”

My grandmother had nine kids.  She was a breastfeeding expert. Everyone called her Masistah. It wasn’t until I was an adult that I learned the reason why she was living with us. Her youngest son had threatened to kill her.

Momí Joanna was born November 18, 1906 and passed away September 20, 1973. [Per Social Security she was born November 18, 1907.] In her obituary, she’s listed as the daughter of a Mr. and Mrs. Silas Daniel [1]. At first, I took the obituary at its face value. Then, one day, my mother mentioned in passing that she did not think Daniel was my grandmother’s true last name.

Over the years, I had heard many names that were said to be my grandmother’s surname: Danner, Daniel, Dante, even Fontenot. I was intrigued. What was my grandmother’s full name?

This research started about 2003. My father, Welton Frank, had already died. So, first, I asked my father’s eldest brother Felton. He suggested Daniel and Dante, but he didn’t really know. I followed up to ask my father’s other siblings: they offered their ideas, but they, too, were unsure. I even asked if they would look at their birth certificates. I had no takers. Reading this, I would imagine you’re thinking, “How can a child not know their mother’s full name?” Well, that was my thought, also.

Uncle Felton did give me a hint on my grandmother’s paternal side: he told me about Uncle Charlie, who was a paternal uncle of my grandmother. Both my mother and my older sister also mentioned an Uncle Charlie. His face was disfigured after being burned badly in a cooking fire accident. He lived primitively, in a log cabin in the woods, possibly in the Bayou Chicot area.

I created a list of known facts about Momí so that I could get to her last name:

  • Father’s name was Silas.
  • Mother’s name was Victoria Leday (Lede).
  • Race would probably be listed as Colored, Negro, or Black.
  • Silas had a brother named Charlie (Charles).
  • Last name may start with a “D”, possibly a “Dan?”.
  • Family most likely lived in and around Saint Landry Parish.
  • Her birth was November 18 in the year 1906 or 1907.
  • She was born, lived, and died in Ville Platte, Louisiana.
  • She had very little schooling.
  • She was married at least 3 times, maybe 4 times: Chester Frank (my grandfather), Horace Ardoin (not sure they married), WC Frank, and Alcide Brown.

So, next I started searching the census the 1910 for a Joanna Daniel, Silas Daniel, and Charles Daniel; this yielded no results. I also looked at the 1900 census to see if I could find anything on Charles or Silas. Still, I could not find anyone who could be my family members.

In March 2008, when I visited the archives in Ville Platte, Louisiana, and obtained copies of two of my grandmother’s marriage certificates, for her marriages to Willie C. Frank [2] and to Alcide Brown [3]. On the license for her marriage to Frank, my grandmother’s typewritten name is listed as Joe Anna Dantan. On the other license, her type written name was listed as Joanna Dantan. However, in both cases, the actual signatures look different from the typewritten names. On the first license the signature looks like Deonton and it looks like Danton on the second license. The first license listed Charlie Denton as a witness.

WC FrankJoanna DentonML

I took another look at the 1900 census, concentrating on Silas and Charles. I still didn’t get any results using the surname Deonton, Dantan, or Danton. I then narrowed the focus on Uncle Charlie and began using search wildcard “*”, I searched for “Charles Dan*”, “Charles Din*” and “Charles Don*”. Still nothing.

Then, I entered “Charles Den*”. Across the screen was the name “Charles Denton.” I selected the record.

In 1900, Charles was the 15-year old son of Samuel and Virginia Denton. He had several siblings: Junis, William, Richard, Caroline, Corinne, and most interestingly a 20-year old brother by the name of Cylus Denton [4]. There was no doubt. I had found my great-grandfather and therefore my grandmother’s surname—Denton.

Charles Den* Census

Charles Den* Census

From, this 1900 census find, I was led to other censuses and found more information on Silas, his siblings, his parents, and grandparents. Silas and Charles were the sons of Samuel and Virginia Denton. I traced back to the 1880 [5] and 1870 census [6], I found that Samuel was the son of Moses and Maria Denton.  Samuel had typhoid fever and passed away on September 28, 1926.  Virginia Denton passed away October 16, 1929 of acute indigestion [7]. Her death certificate lists Charlie Denton as the informant (the person who provides information on the deceased, which may include the name, date and place of birth, and address.)

Virginia Denton Death Certificate

Virginia Denton Death Certificate

Sam Denton death certificate

Sam Denton death certificate

In 2010, I found the marriage license of my paternal grandparents.  [See previous post.]  The names were spelled, let’s say, differently.  Also, obtained a copy of Silas’ death certificate where I learned that additional information on Silas.  His nickname was ‘Buster’.  He had remarried and was living in St. Mary Parish.

Silas Buster Denton draft

Silas Buster Denton draft

Silas Denton Death Certificate

Silas Denton Death Certificate

I took a DNA test recently and matched with an unfamiliar cousin. Together, we are now exploring the possibility of our connection through Samuel Denton.  Just think, if I had not followed the call of my ancestors, I would not have looked into identifying my grandmother’s ancestors and her name may have forever been lost.

With this research effort, may my grandmother’s name always be remembered: Joanna Denton.

Notes:

[1] Obsequies of Mrs. Joanna Brown for services September 24, 1973, Dr. M.L. Thomas, Pastor.

[2] Louisiana State Department of Health Certificate of Marriage File No. 22-476. Groom: Willie C. Frank; Bride: Joe Anna Dantan, December 17, 1953.

[3] State of Louisiana Certificate of Marriage State File No. 117. Groom: Alcide Brown; Bride: Joanna Dantan, February 25, 1969.

[4] 1900 U. S. Census, Census Place: Ward 5, St Landry, Louisiana; Roll: 581; Page: 28A: Enumeration District: 59; FHL microfilm: 1240581. Charles Denton and Cylus [Silas] Denton.

[5] 1880 U. S. Census, Census Place: 5th Ward, St Landry, Louisiana; Roll: 470; Family History Film: 1254470; Page: 325C; enumeration District: 043: Image: Samuel Denton, head of household.

[6] 1870 U. S. Census, Census Place: Ward 3, St Landry, Louisiana; Roll: M593_530; Page: 110A; Image: 225; Family History Library Film: 552029. Image: Samuel Denton.

[7] Louisiana State Board of Health Certificate of Death of Virginia Denton, October 16, 1929.

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